A few days ago, I wrote about using Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates to deploy Azure Event Grid. That sample showed how to create a new Event Grid Topic resource. This basically gives you an URL you can publish custom events to and have them routed to one or more event subscribers.

However, one of the very powerful features in Event Grid is not custom topics, but subscribing to events published by the Azure fabric itself; that is, events published by Resource Manager Providers. As of these writings, only a few providers support Event Grid, but this number is sure to grow in the coming months.

Supported Event Publishers

What Azure resource manager providers support Event Grid? An easy way to find this out is to ask Azure itself. To do this, we can leverage the excellent ArmClient tool. Resource Managers that support publishing events through Event Grid are called Topic Types, and we can query these:

armclient get /providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes?api-version=2017-06-15-preview

If the command succeeds, we should see something like this:

{
  "value": [
    {
      "properties": {
        "provider": "Microsoft.Eventhub",
        "displayName": "EventHubs Namespace",
        "description": "Microsoft EventHubs service events.",
        "resourceRegionType": "RegionalResource",
        "provisioningState": "Succeeded"
      },
      "id": "providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes/Microsoft.Eventhub.Namespaces",
      "name": "Microsoft.Eventhub.Namespaces",
      "type": "Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes"
    },
    ...
  ]
}

You can also use the Azure CLI command az eventgrid topic-type list on version 2.0.14 or later.

Knowing what event publishes exists is only half the story, though. We also want to know what type of events a publisher supports. These are called Event Types in Event Grid, and we can query those as well.

For example, let’s say we want to find out events supported by the Microsoft.Resources.ResourceGroups topic type:

armclient get /providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes/Microsoft.Resources.ResourceGroups/eventTypes?api-version=2017-06-15-preview

If the command succeeds, we should see an output similar to the following:

{
  "value": [
    {
      "properties": {
        "displayName": "Resource Write Success",
        "description": "Raised when a resource create or update operation succeeds.",
        "schemaUrl": "TBD"
      },
      "id": "providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes/Microsoft.Resources.ResourceGroups/eventTypes/Microsoft.Resources.ResourceWriteSuccess",
      "name": "Microsoft.Resources.ResourceWriteSuccess",
      "type": "Microsoft.EventGrid/topicTypes/eventTypes"
    },
    ...
  ]
}

The equivalent Azure CLI command would be az eventgrid topic-type list-event-types --name Microsoft.Resources.ResourceGroups.

Now let’s see how we can subscribe to events published by the Azure fabric.

Event Hub Namespaces

Currently, you can only subscribe to events published at the Event Hub Namespace level, not an individual Event Hub itself. For this we’d use the Microsoft.EventHub.Namespaces topic type to create a nested resource of type Microsoft.EventGrid/eventSubscriptions:

{
    "apiVersion": "2017-06-17-preview",
    "name": "[concat(parameters('eventHubNamespaceName'), '/Microsoft.EventGrid/', parameters('subscriptionName'))]",
    "type": "Microsoft.EventHub/namespaces/providers/eventSubscriptions",
    "tags": {
        "displayName": "Webhook Subscription"
    },
    "dependsOn": [
        "[concat('Microsoft.EventHub/Namespaces/', parameters('eventHubNamespaceName'))]"
    ],
    "properties": {
        "destination": {
            "endpointType": "WebHook",
            "properties": {
                "endpointUrl": "[parameters('webhookUrl')]"
            }
        },
        "filter": {
            "includedEventTypes": [ "All" ],
            "subjectBeginsWith": "",
            "subjectEndsWith": "",
            "subjectIsCaseSensitive": false
        }
    }
}

Notice that the type property has the format <parent_resource_type>/providers/<child_resource_type> as is standard practice in ARM Templates. The name property would then start with the name of the parent resource (the Event Hub Namespace, in this case), followed by ‘/Microsoft.EventGrid/` and the name of the new resource representing the event grid subscription.

Resource Groups

The Microsoft.Resources.ResourceGroups topic type publishes events on management operations on a resources in an specific resource group. Using ARM, we’d create this as a top-level resource on the template resource group:

{
    "apiVersion": "2017-06-15-preview",
    "name": "[parameters('subscriptionName')]",
    "type": "Microsoft.EventGrid/eventSubscriptions",
    "tags": {
        "displayName": "Webhook Subscription"
    },
    "properties": {
        "destination": {
            "endpointType": "WebHook",
            "properties": {
                "endpointUrl": "[parameters('webhookUrl')]"
            }
        },
        "filter": {
            "includedEventTypes": [ "All" ],
            "subjectBeginsWith": "",
            "subjectEndsWith": "",
            "subjectIsCaseSensitive": false
        }
    }
}

Subscriptions

The Microsoft.Resources.Subscriptions topic type publishes events on management operations on an entire Azure subscription. This is a more interesting scenario, because an event subscription at the Azure-subscription level (pardon the redundancy) is a global resource itself that doesn’t belong to a resource group.

Unforunately, I have been unable to find a magical incantation that can create such a resource on an ARM template, since an ARM deployment is always done on a resource group. I do hope there is a way to do this, as otherwise automating a solution will be a bit harder.

Anyway, creating one using ArmClient is quite possible. To do this, first create a text file with the right JSON content. For example:

{
  "properties": {
    "destination": {
      "endpointType": "WebHook",
      "properties": {
        "endpointUrl": "https://requestb.in/1i0mp2v1"
      }
    },
    "filter": {
      "includedEventTypes": [ "All" ],
      "subjectBeginsWith": "",
      "subjectEndsWith": "",
      "subjectIsCaseSensitive": false
    }
  }
}

Then use ArmClient to create global resource. To do this, you will need the Azure subscrition_id, the name you want to provide to your Event Grid event subscription, and the path of the JSON file created in the previous step:

armclient put /subscriptions/<subscription_id>/providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/eventSubscriptions/<name>?api-version=2017-06-15-preview @<file>

Listing Event Subscriptions

Another useful thing to know is how to manage existing Event Grid event subscriptions.

We can easily list all event subscriptions created on an Azure subscription using the two commands:

armclient get /subscriptions/<subscription_id>/providers/Microsoft.EventGrid/eventSubscriptions?api-version=2017-06-15-preview

az eventgrid event-subscription list

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article gives you a few ideas on how to work with Event Grid and how to automate creating event grid event subscriptions for different Azure Resources.


Tomas Restrepo

Software developer located in Colombia. Sr. PFE at Microsoft.